Dallas, Texas - A simple walking speed test may help predict whether young adult stroke survivors are ready to return to work, according to new research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

Dallas, Texas - Taking one daily pill that combined medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol lowered heart disease risk among underserved patients better than taking several separate medications to treat these risk factors, according to new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine and funded by the American Heart Association, the leading voluntary health organization devoted to a world of longer, healthier lives.

Dallas, Texas - Cardiac MRI analysis can be performed significantly faster with similar precision to experts when using automated machine learning, according to new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal.

Washington, DC - Thursday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is recommending that duodenoscope manufacturers and health care facilities transition to different types of duodenoscopes that may pose less risk to patient safety. Specifically, because of challenges with cleaning these devices for reuse (reprocessing) and persistent high levels of contamination, the agency is recommending moving away from using duodenoscopes with fixed endcaps to those with disposable components that include disposable endcaps—or to fully disposable duodenoscopes when they become available. Disposable designs simplify or eliminate the need for reprocessing, which may reduce between-patient duodenoscope contamination as compared to reusable, or fixed endcaps.

New Orleans, Louisiana - Adults who received more intensive treatment to lower their blood pressure were less likely to experience drastic blood pressure drops, which can cause dizziness and increase risk of falling, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.

Washington, DC - During 2012-2016, an average of 43,999 HPV-associated cancers were reported each year, according to a new study published today in CDC’s  Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). Among the estimated 34,800 cancers probably caused by HPV, 92 percent are attributable to the HPV types that are included in the HPV vaccine and could be prevented if HPV vaccine recommendations were followed, according to the report.