Washington, DC - Pelvic pain associated with endometriosis often becomes chronic and can persist (or recur) following surgical and hormonal interventions. According to results published in Regional Anesthesia & Pain Medicine, treating pelvic floor muscle spasm with botulinum toxin may relieve pain and improve quality of life. The study was conducted by scientists at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Washington, DC - Anyone who has ever sensed that a person is sick simply by looking at their face has experienced the wealth of information conveyed by face color. A new study by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, provides evidence that the human brain’s visual system is especially sensitive to the color of faces compared to the colors of other objects or things. Study results were published today in Nature Communications.

Washington, DC - Researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of using algorithms that analyze electronic health records (EHRs) to help physicians identify patients at risk for HIV who may benefit from preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which significantly reduces the risk of getting HIV (link is external). The studies, which were supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, advance a novel method that can help clinicians identify individuals most in need of PrEP.

Washington, DC - Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval to Xpovio (selinexor) tablets in combination with the corticosteroid dexamethasone for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) who have received at least four prior therapies and whose disease is resistant to several other forms of treatment, including at least two proteasome inhibitors, at least two immunomodulatory agents, and an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody.

Washington, DC - "We believe in giving patients choice and freedom in healthcare, ensuring access to the doctors they want, the treatments they need, and the highest standard of medical care anywhere in the world." ~ President Donald J. Trump

Washington, DC - "Since 2012 when the FDA first approved Truvada for a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) indication, there has been a safe and effective HIV prevention method that, when used along with safer sex practices, can help lower the chances of getting sexually-transmitted HIV,” said Debra Birnkrant, M.D., director of FDA’s Division of Antiviral Products. “We have also reinforced to health care professionals and at-risk individuals that before starting PrEP with Truvada, or emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, and during its use, health care professionals should routinely screen patients for HIV, at least once every three months.