Washington, DC - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today permitted marketing of the Dexcom G6 integrated continuous glucose monitoring (iCGM) system for determining blood glucose (sugar) levels in children aged two and older and adults with diabetes. This is the first type of continuous glucose monitoring system permitted by the agency to be used as part of an integrated system with other compatible medical devices and electronic interfaces, which may include automated insulin dosing systems, insulin pumps, blood glucose meters or other electronic devices used for diabetes management. Today’s authorization also classifies this new type of device in class II and subjects it to certain criteria called special controls. This enables developers of future iCGM systems to bring their products to market in the least burdensome manner possible.

Stanford, California - When a doctor or nurse suspects something is wrong with a patient’s heart, there’s a simple way to check: put a stethoscope over the heart and listen to the sounds it makes. Doctors and nurses can use the same diagnostic tool to figure out what’s going on with the heart, lungs, stomach and more, but not the brain – although that could change with a new device.

Los Angeles, California - More than 29,000 women in California will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2018. Many of them - especially low-income women, who suffer the worst survival rates — will face economic, emotional and structural obstacles to getting treatment and follow-up care.

Rochester, Minnesota - What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness is the act of being intensely aware of what you're sensing and feeling at every moment - without interpretation or judgment.

Rochester, Minnesota - Diaper rash can alarm parents and annoy babies. The rash causes reddish, puffy, irritated skin in the diaper area. The rash generally is caused by a combination of moisture, acid in urine or stool, and chaffing of diaper fabric on your baby's skin.

Rochester, Minnesota - More than 54 million Americans suffer from painful, swollen joints caused by arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A new report from the CDC highlights for the first time the prevalence and health-related characteristics of arthritis across the U.S. Dr. Eric Matteson, a rheumatologist at Mayo Clinic, says one form of the chronic condition, rheumatoid arthritis, can affect more than joints. It can affect a person's heart, eyes, lungs and kidneys.