Treasury Continues Targeting Sinaloa Cartel Leadership

Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of the Treasury announced the designation of Jose Guadalupe Tapia Quintero, a Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico based senior lieutenant of the Sinaloa Cartel. Jose Guadalupe Tapia Quintero was designated for his role in the drug trafficking activities of Ismael “Mayo” Zambada Garcia and for playing a significant role in international drug trafficking.

“We will continue to target all aspects of the Sinaloa Cartel,” said Treasury’s Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) Adam J. Szubin. “Our actions will focus on the financial nerve points as well as the underlying logistics that are essential to the cartel’s day-to-day operations, such as the transportation network that we are taking action against today.”

Tapia Quintero oversees the transportation of cocaine and marijuana for the Zambada Garcia drug trafficking organization and is responsible for coordinating the purchase and transportation of cocaine and methamphetamine from Sinaloa into the U.S., specifically Arizona and California, on a monthly basis. Tapia Quintero also transports methamphetamine on behalf of a drug trafficking cell affiliated with Joaquin “Chapo” Guzman Loera from Sinaloa to Tijuana, Baja California via tractor trailers. The President identified Joaquin Guzman Loera, Ismael Zambada Garcia, and the Sinaloa Cartel as significant foreign narcotics traffickers pursuant to the Kingpin Act in 2001, 2002 and 2009, respectively.

Today’s action is taken with the support of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), specifically the Phoenix Field Division, and the multi-agency OCDETF Strike Force.

“DEA and its OFAC partners will not allow these dangerous cartels and their associates to exploit the U.S. financial system,” said DEA Special Agent in Charge Doug Coleman. "We’re relentlessly following the financial trail to deprive these traffickers of their assets, draining the lifeblood from their criminal enterprises.”

Pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (Kingpin Act), this designation generally prohibits U.S. persons from conducting financial or commercial transactions with Tapia Quintero, and also freezes any assets he may have under U.S. jurisdiction.

Since June 2000, the President has identified 103 drug kingpins, and OFAC has designated more than 1300 entities and individuals, pursuant to the Kingpin Act. Penalties for violations of the Kingpin Act range from civil penalties of up to $1.075 million per violation to more severe criminal penalties. Criminal penalties for corporate officers may include up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $5 million. Criminal fines for corporations may reach $10 million. Other individuals could face up to 10 years in prison and fines pursuant to Title 18 of the United States Code for criminal violations of the Kingpin Act.

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