Nuestra Familia Leader and Three Associates Plead Guilty to Drug Trafficking Charges

Fresno, California - Shawn Cameron, 36; his wife Vanessa Mojarro Cameron, 26; and Jonathan Mojarro, 24, all of Hanford, and Carlos Enriquez, 34, of Lemoore, pled guilty today to drug trafficking offenses, United States Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner announced.

Forty-three defendants were charged in this case. Seven of the defendants are set to proceed to trial on March 11, 2014, before Judge O’Neill, and two have not yet appeared in federal court. All defendants were members or associates of the Nuestra Familia (NF). NF is a violent Hispanic prison gang based within the California prison system whose members exert control over street-level Norteño gang members engaged in drug trafficking and violent crime.

“Shawn Cameron was the leader of one of the most dangerous drug trafficking organizations in the Central Valley,” U.S. Attorney Wagner said. “Today’s guilty pleas mark a very significant step in the efforts of federal, state, and local law enforcement to disable the NF organization.”

“This investigation is the essence of great law enforcement collaboration and teamwork in removing narcotics from our communities,” said Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives Special Agent in Charge Joseph M. Riehl. “ATF and our law enforcement partners stay committed to identifying, apprehending, and prosecuting dangerous criminals and this investigation exemplifies this commitment.”

“The cohesiveness displayed by the numerous law enforcement agencies during this gang investigation is a testament of our commitment to uniting our resources to achieve a common goal. This investigation resulted in the successful identification and arrest of those who engage in trafficking conspiracies which erode our communities,” said Special Agent in Charge Monica M. Miller of the Sacramento Division of the FBI. “Drug trafficking networks continue to threaten the safety of the public without regard. The FBI is will continue collaborating on large-scale and long term intensive investigations to disrupt and dismantle these violent organizations.”

According to court documents, between December 2009 and June 2010, Shawn Cameron was the commander for the Kings County regiment of Nuestra Familia. Cameron worked with a co-conspirator to bring in methamphetamine from Mexico and distribute it in half-pound to multi-pound quantities to other regiments in and outside of California. During that time, Cameron and co-conspirators obtained more than 45 pounds of methamphetamine that was distributed or intended to be distributed to various NF regiments throughout California, Utah, and other states.

In April 2010, Vanessa Cameron used her phone to assist her husband in arranging to receive payment for methamphetamine and to arrange the delivery of methamphetamine.

In 2009 and 2010, Mojarro and Enriquez were members of the Kings County NF regiment. They assisted the NF by picking up, delivering, and selling methamphetamine and cocaine.

This case is the product of an investigation by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; the Kings County Narcotic Task Force; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Drug Enforcement Administration; the California Department of Justice Bureau of Narcotic Enforcement; and the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. These agencies received the assistance of the U.S. Marshals Service; the police departments of Hanford, Lemoore, and Corcoran; the Kings County Sheriff’s Office; and the California Highway Patrol. Assistant United States Attorneys Kimberly A. Sanchez, Kathleen A. Servatius, and Melanie L. Alsworth are prosecuting the case.

Vanessa Cameron is scheduled to be sentenced by United States District Judge Lawrence J. O’Neill on April 7, 2014. Shawn Cameron, Mojarro, and Enriquez are scheduled to be sentenced by Judge O’Neill on April 21, 2014. Shawn Cameron, Mojarro, and Enriquez face 10 years to life in prison and a $4 million fine. Vanessa Mojarro Cameron faces a maximum statutory penalty of four years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The actual sentences, however, will be determined at the discretion of the court after consideration of any applicable statutory factors and the Federal Sentencing Guidelines, which take into account a number of variables.

Additional information