Washington, DC - Following a public comment period, the Federal Trade Commission has approved a final order designed to remedy the anticompetitive effects resulting from Baxter’s proposed $625 million acquisition of Claris’ injectable drugs business.

Washington, DC - Houston and the Texas Gulf Coast are devastated. Never has an area been so blasted by so much rainfall in such a short amount of time. Houston has received more rainfall than other city across the United States receives in one entire year. So far over 51 inches of rain has fallen with more rainfall to come. Everyone in America and much of the world with a Television or computer knows about the suffering of Houston. Our prayers go out to them as well as our financial support, our manpower and anything we can do to help the millions of people who are homeless and suffering.

Washington, DC - The Department of State’s Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) has shortlisted twenty-six design firms for the Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Worldwide Design Services solicitation. The IDIQ provides comprehensive Architecture/Engineering (A/E) services for both new construction and modernization projects at U.S. diplomatic facilities worldwide.

Changi Naval Base, Republic Of Singapore (NNS) -- The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) and 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit departed Singapore after supporting the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) August 27. America will continue on its maiden deployment.

Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced new updates to its popular FoodKeeper application that will provide users with new information on food safety recalls. The app has been updated so users can choose to receive automatic notifications when food safety recalls are announced by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Washington, DC - The first big case involving fingerprint evidence in the United States was the murder trial of Thomas Jennings in Chicago in 1911. Jennings had broken into a home in the middle of the night and, when discovered by the homeowner, shot the man dead. He was convicted based on fingerprints left at the crime scene, and for most of the next century, fingerprints were considered, both in the courts and in the public imagination, to be all but infallible as a method of identification.