California firm recalls veal trimmings due to possible E. Coli O157:H7 contamination

Washington, DC - San Jose Valley Veal, a Santa Clara, California establishment, is recalling approximately 1,260 pounds of veal trimmings that may be contaminated with E. Coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today.

The following products are subject to recall:

  • 60-pound, cardboard box cases of "SAN JOSE VALLEY VEAL AND BEEF INC." boneless veal trimmings.


Boxes may contain the case codes: "L-1 11112," "L-1 11212," "L-1 11512," "L-1 11612," "L-1 11712," "L-1 11812" or "L-1 11912" and also bear the establishment number "EST. 2828" inside the USDA mark of inspection.

The products subject to recall were produced between Nov. 1 and Nov. 9, 2012 then were transported to a federal facility for further distribution. FSIS and the establishment are concerned that some product may be frozen and in customers' freezers.

The problem was discovered when a customer tested a shipment of veal and reported non-negative results. The customer held the shipment pending laboratory results, but other product from the producer's same lot had shipped into commerce.

FSIS and the company have received no reports of illnesses associated with consumption of these products. Individuals concerned about an illness should contact a healthcare provider.

FSIS routinely conducts recall effectiveness checks to verify recalling firms notify their customers (including restaurants) of the recall and to ensure that steps are taken to make certain that the product is no longer available to consumers.

E. Coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause dehydration, bloody diarrhea and abdominal cramps 2-8 days (3-4 days, on average) after exposure to the organism. While most people recover within a week, some develop a type of kidney failure called HUS. This condition can occur among persons of any age but is most common in children under 5-years old and older adults. Symptoms of HUS may include fever, abdominal pain, pale skin tone, fatigue and irritability, small, unexplained bruises or bleeding from the nose and mouth, decreased urination, and swelling. Persons who experience these symptoms should seek emergency medical care immediately.

FSIS advises all consumers to safely prepare their raw meat products, including fresh and frozen, and only consume ground beef that has been cooked to a temperature of 160° F. The only way to confirm that ground beef is cooked to a temperature high enough to kill harmful bacteria is to use a food thermometer that measures internal temperature.

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