Santa Barbara, California - For decades, women in business strove to become members of the boys' club. We mimicked how men thought, communicated, and even dressed. But now, trying too hard to tap into our "masculine side" has gone the way of severely tailored 1980s power wear (complete with giant shoulder pads). Women have realized that we think and communicate differently—which means that we also lead differently. And—here's the best news—because our natural skill set is increasingly valued in the global economy, we're perfectly positioned to become today's and tomorrow's leaders.

(As the powerful and popular campaign by Always proves, doing anything "like a girl" is something to be proud of—and that includes leading!)

"Women already have the raw material we need to become successful leaders," says Dr. Nancy D. O'Reilly, who along with 19 other women, cowrote the new book Leading Women: 20 Influential Women Share Their Secrets to Leadership, Business, and Life (Adams Media, 2015, ISBN: 978-1-440-58417-6, $16.99, "We just need to shift our attitudes and master the best practices to put these natural skills and abilities to work."

To be clear, this isn't a contest between the sexes. As one of O'Reilly's coauthors Lois P. Frankel, PhD, points out, women aren't better leaders than men—just different leaders. And bonus: What followers expect from leaders in the first decades of the 21st century are behaviors and characteristics traditionally associated with women.

In her book O'Reilly has brought together 20 nationally acclaimed women authors to share their real-life advice for breaking free of women's traditional limitations in work and community. Coauthors include New York Times and Amazon best-selling authors, corporate coaches, an Emmy Award-winning television host, and more.

Here, O'Reilly and some of her coauthors share 10 ways you can use your feminine strengths to lead like a girl:

Reframe your ideas about power. If you think power necessarily means "command and control leadership," think again. Women wield our own style of power and, frankly, it packs quite a punch. (Consider the fact that we influence 85 percent of all buying decisions and are thus pivotal to the success of many industries.) Often, just shifting the way we think about power can make women feel more comfortable with taking the lead.

O'Reilly's coauthor Gloria Feldt explains that instead of seeking "power over," women are more comfortable seeking the "power to." Feminine power is the ability to accomplish our goals, provide for our families, and make the world a better place—and to help others do the same.

"Women understand that more for you doesn't mean less for me, that power isn't a finite resource," O'Reilly comments. "The more girl power we use, the more of it there is."

Don't try to be the strong, silent type. Because women are seen as talkative and chatty (often non-productively so), many make a conscious effort to hold their tongues in professional settings. But research suggests that this is a misconception: Men actually talk more and hold the floor longer than women during meetings.

Claire Damken Brown, PhD (another coauthor), says that women's reputation for wordiness might stem from the fact that our talk patterns are indirect and detail-driven, meaning that we usually provide more background information than men. But research has found that women talk to exchange information and establish cohesion.

"So as long as you stay focused on goals instead of gossip and practice the art of the brief response, it's okay to use your words," O'Reilly observes. "Odds are, your feminine communication is making you an effective leader."

Ask for help. The traditional image of the "strong" leader is a man who is self-sufficient and capable. He's the prototypical rugged individualist and never asks for help. Of course, this is an outdated stereotype, but for many leaders (male and female alike), the reluctance to ask for help persists. What we need to understand is that women have long realized the benefits of tapping into the resources and expertise of others—Will you watch the kids? What's your advice? Can we work together on this?—and it's an incredibly efficient—and effective—way to get things done.

"For millennia, women have actively built strong, supportive connections to help their 'sisters' live their very best lives," points out O'Reilly. "Because women don't mind admitting what we don't know and are willing to share the credit, we are good at spotting problems and making sure they get fixed. When we don't let our egos get in the way of asking for help, we're far more likely to achieve progress and success."

Take to the podium, woman-style. How many women do you know who'd rather do almost anything than speak in public? Anxiety about public speaking is common to both women and men, but it's especially important that women overcome this fear. To advance in leadership roles, women will need to be seen and heard at the podium—and be remembered positively afterward.

Leading Women contributor Lois Phillips, PhD, says women have a natural affinity for public speaking. We tend to provide information to help listeners achieve their goals, rather than to establish dominance over the group or negotiate status. We also want to connect to our audience and have an innate ability to read and respond to their nonverbal cues.

Shift your perspective (and theirs, too). Women have a special brand of resilience. We are able not only to power through tough times, but are often able to creatively use obstacles as teachable moments and stepping stones. And a big part of this quality has to do with an ability to reframe who we think we are and what we think we deserve. (M. Bridget Cook-Burch tackles this subject in Leading Women.)

"The stories we tell ourselves about events in our lives are every bit as powerful as the events themselves," says O'Reilly. "For example, if your company is failing in one area, you might see that 'failure' as a springboard to move in a fresh new direction. Being able to shift your focus away from what you don't want to the things you'd like to create will not only help you survive and grow; it can help your entire organization become more future-focused and productive."

Stop trying to network. Instead, connect. Women love to make satisfying, mutually fulfilling connections with each other. (And we're good at it!) That's why the mile-wide-inch-deep world of social media, insincere business card exchanges, and traditional "What can you do for me?" networking often leaves us feeling cold.

"The good news is, it's easy to start asking instead, 'What can we create together?'" O'Reilly comments. "This is Connecting 2.0—it's the powerful force behind the women-helping-women movement that is rapidly changing the playing field for women in business, government, education, philanthropy, and other fields. It feels good and it works.

"There are so many ways to make authentic connections," she adds. "You can gather successful women in your community and organize a roundtable discussion. You can collaborate with a different team at work. You can get involved with a philanthropic cause. The idea is to reach out to other women, offer to share resources, and see what happens."

Don't be afraid to get a little personal. Historically, female leaders have tried to compensate for being the "emotional," "soft" sex by keeping it all business, all the time. But women's ability to nurture relationships can actually be a huge asset in a business context. The quality of a leader's relationships with peers and employees can have a major impact on company culture and morale, and thus productivity and growth.

"Feminine skills like showing empathy, being emotionally intelligent, being able to put others at ease, caring about their concerns, and more are now 'must-have' abilities for leaders," notes O'Reilly. "And make no mistake, these are not 'soft skills'; they are actually quite difficult to learn and develop. Case in point: As my coauthor Birute Regine, EdD, points out, no one ever succeeded in mastering relational intelligence during a two-hour seminar."

Extend a helping hand, especially to other women. Women are natural collaborators. We know the significance of a helping hand, mutual support, and mentorship, and we value the satisfaction and meaning that come from aiding others. In the workplace, this ability can mean the difference between being a "boss" and being a "leader"—a distinction that creates employee buy-in and engagement.

"Giving your time, knowledge, understanding, empathy, and support to other people can have a huge ROI," observes O'Reilly. "Be especially vigilant for opportunities to help other women by being a sponsor or mentor. This can lead to improved opportunities for both of you via reciprocity. Plus, it sets a positive example and is good karma. Helping other women claim their power and passion is always a sound investment. When the hands that rock the cradle join together, they really can rule the world."

Use your collaboration skills to tap into "collective intelligence." Successful collaboration is a lot more than just putting a group of people in a room and asking them to work together. As Birute Regine, EdD, notes, it requires participants to accurately read nonverbal cues and others' emotions, to use empathy, to put ego aside, and to be sensitive to fairness and turn-taking. All of these are feminine skills. Without them, collaboration can easily devolve into group-think and follow-the-leader. With them, though, a group becomes capable of "evolved thinking."

Furthermore, Regine says, research shows that groups are most likely to display a level of creativity that's greater than the sum of its parts when at least half the chairs around the table are occupied by women.

"Women are adept at creating conditions of mutuality, equality, and trust—all of which are necessary for team members to feel comfortable enough to share ideas and take risks," observes O'Reilly. "That's why it's so important for women in leadership positions to reach out to bring other women into the fold. When we join forces, the benefits have a powerful ripple effect that extends well beyond the original participants. No individual woman is as creative, skilled, or powerful as we are together."

Trust yourself. From the way we dress to the jobs we do to the way we spend our time, society feels especially free to tell women how to live their lives. It's very easy to internalize those voices and allow them to shape our choices, aspirations, and dreams—a path that leads to regret for too many women.

"Trust yourself and listen to your instincts," O'Reilly urges. "They are usually right. Don't let anyone make you doubt yourself by telling you what you 'should' think or feel. One of the best ways I've found to stay on track is to stay present and turn on your senses. When facing opposition or making a decision, tune in to how you're feeling, not just physically, but spiritually and emotionally too. If you're headed in a good direction, you should feel alive and energized."

"As women, it truly is our time to step up and take our place as leaders," concludes O'Reilly. "When we focus and hone our feminine skills, we can make a positive impact on our companies, our communities, and our world."